Nour-Eddine Aboudihaj

Co-Founder, Grenfell Trust

Co-Founder, Grenfell Trust

As part of his continuous Personal Development he recently did a Post Graduate Diploma in Education at Canterbury Christ Church University. He has a pool of skills, and a body of knowledge that have enabled him to spearhead and successfully deliver many projects that benefited the local youth, women and older people in the community.  He is now working with Justice for Grenfell to campaign and founder of Grenfell Trust to support and seek justice for the people affected as a response to the Grenfell Tower Fire.  

Nour-Eddine Aboudihaj

He recently published a book which is part memoir and part self-improvement entitled “The Straight Path to Success”.  He is a University Lecturer and a Transformation Coach. He graduated from Hassan II University-Casablanca with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English Literature Languages and finished his post-graduate studies in the University of Westminster, London. He also has Post Graduate Diploma in Education from Canterbury Christ Church University.

He has a pool of skills, and a body of knowledge and extensive experience that has enabled him to spearhead and successfully deliver many projects that have benefited many BME communities. He is working with Grenfell Trust to coordinate the activities and mental health support for the people affected by the Grenfell Tower Fire.

Nour-Eddine Aboudihaj is busy helping the community in North Kensington collect and deliver food to those in need during the coronavirus crisis after his involvement in the Grenfell Inquiry paused when the hearings were put on hold.

Now he has recently written a poem about the crisis and how the community has responded which has received high praise.  Nour believes that the coronavirus pandemic has really put the important things in life under the spotlight and it’s important that we learn from adversity so that we can come back with a better resilience. What’s happening is a lesson – the same with Grenfell; a parallel between the good things and also some of the less good things. Nour also believes that people have acknowledged that we have lost our way and have to look at the way we do things.”

Gestures such as a hug or touch to support each other had been very important with the North Kensington community in the days and years after Grenfell, and although some are unable to be close to each other during the pandemic, the lessons of kindness learnt after Grenfell and during the pandemic should be enduring.  He believes that we will have a paradigm shift and people need to make sure they hold onto the important things in life including community and kindness and value them, rather than the “wrong assumptions” such as competitiveness and instead he suggests that the lessons could mean “Our bright future is in our compassionate togetherness.”

 

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